Monday, March 23, 2015

The Return of the Living Dead

As I would discover, The Return of the Living Dead appeals to a certain type of movie enthusiast and may have not been a great choice of movie while dating. This is probably why I am single to this day and will remain that way. Oh well, the woman who can't appreciate a horror classic doesn't know what she is missing.

After looking at  Zombeavers (link), I had to check out Return of the Living Dead, the zombie comedy that influenced movies like Zombeavers, Zombieland,  and Dead Snow, and enjoy it all over again.

This is the movie with Linnea Quigley's "naked grave dance" ... naked zombies are cool.

Barry's movie score 5 stars, Barry's date score 1, Barry's fond memories of the beautiful zombie played by Linnea Quigley 5 stars.


 



Product Description

Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the cemetery'those brain-eating zombies are back and hungry for more tasty mortals. A fiendish mix of outrageous humor and heart-stopping terror, The Return of the Living Dead is a veritable smorgasbord of fun (LA Herald-Examiner) filled with skin-crawling jolts, eye-popping visuals and relentless surprise! On his first day on the job at an army surplus store, poor Freddy unwittingly releases nerve gas from a secret U.S. military canister, unleashing an unbelievable terror. The gas re-animates a corps of corpses, who arise from their graves with a ravenous hunger for human brains! And luckily for those carnivorous cadavers, there is a group of partying teens nearby, just waiting to be eaten!

Amazon.com

"Do ya wanna party?" challenges the soundtrack to this freaky and funny reworking of George Romero's Night of the Living Dead. Paced to the beat of a pounding rock score, this comic flesh feast delivers both laughs and outlandish gore. No longer lumbering, moaning creatures, these lithe, feral, and cunning undead claw their way out of the cemetery and into the skulls of a human smorgasbord. They even master the art of home delivery: "Send more cops," croaks a corpse into a patrol car radio. Director Dan O'Bannon even takes pains to explain their motivation between the tributes to the granddaddy of zombie horrors ("Well, it worked in the movie!" screams James Karen when a pickax to the skull hardly phases a lively cadaver). Not that it really matters amid the gore and gallows humor, but it does add a kick to the cynically sinister climax. --Sean Axmaker